• Remsha places as a finalist in RCSI mini-heats for science communication competition 'FameLab Ireland'

 

A worldwide competition in science communication, FameLab first came alive at the Cheltenham Science Festival in the UK in 2005, and has since increased in popularity around the world! Currently held in over 30 different countries each year, its motive is to get scientists to share their research with the public in an informative yet entertaining way. Think of it like X-factor for scientists, where participants deliver various wonderful scientific topics to a public audience, and are then judged on their content, clarity, and of course, their ‘X-factor’ or charisma. To make matters more challenging for scientists, who so heavily rely on PowerPoint presentations, FameLab only allows a few small props but mostly the participants’ wits to help them deliver three-minute talks on their respective topics.

November 2018 saw FameLab come to RCSI for the first time for a mini-heat session where 10 hopeful contestants from a range of age groups and disciplines battled to gain the judges’ and audiences’ approval. In the end only two could get through to the Dublin regionals (to be held on the 22nd of February 2019). One of those two winners was Remsha. Her winning talk was titled ˜’The Pacman in our body’, which alluded to the ability of macrophage cells to ingest pathogens and cellular debris, how this ability can be dysfunctional in autoimmune disease, and possible ways to manipulate a macrophage therapeutically. Remsha chose this topic to spread awareness about the research her lab does on macrophages in autoimmunity.

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For her success at the RCSI heats, Remsha was interviewed by the Irish Times for an article they wrote on FameLab and science communication that was published in Jan 2019.

To read the full article click here “Talking science: FameLab and 180 seconds of fame

RCSI twitter account picks up Irish Times article on FameLab

RCSI twitter account picks up Irish Times article on FameLab

McCoy LabRCSI